A NEO‐DARWINIAN COMMENTARY ON MACROEVOLUTION

@article{Charlesworth1982ANC,
  title={A NEO‐DARWINIAN COMMENTARY ON MACROEVOLUTION},
  author={Brian Charlesworth and Russell Lande and Montgomery Slatkin},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1982},
  volume={36}
}
The neo-Darwinian synthesis that resulted from the integration of Mendelian genetics into evolutionary theory has dominated evolutionary biology for the last 30 to 40 years, due largely to its agreement with a huge body of experimental and observational data. The classic works representative of this school of thought come from the fields of genetics (Fisher, 1930; Wright, 1931; Haldane, 1932; Dobzhansky, 1937; Muller, 1940), development (de Beer, 1940), zoology, (Huxley, 1942; Mayr, 1942… 

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