A Modern Search for Wolf-Rayet Stars in the Magellanic Clouds. IV. A Final Census

@article{Neugent2018AMS,
  title={A Modern Search for Wolf-Rayet Stars in the Magellanic Clouds. IV. A Final Census},
  author={Kathryn F. Neugent and Philip Massey and Nidia I. Morrell},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={2018},
  volume={863}
}
We summarize the results of our 4 yr survey searching for Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud. Over the course of this survey we have discovered 15 new WR stars and 12 Of-type stars. In this last year we discovered two rare Of-type stars: an O6.5f?p and an O6nfp, in addition to the two new Of?p stars discovered in our first year and the three Onfp stars discovered in our second and third years. However, even more exciting was our discovery of a… 

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