A Missing Paradigm? Military Captivity and the Prisoner of War, 1914–18

@article{Jones2008AMP,
  title={A Missing Paradigm? Military Captivity and the Prisoner of War, 1914–18},
  author={H. Jones},
  journal={Immigrants & Minorities},
  year={2008},
  volume={26},
  pages={19 - 48}
}
  • H. Jones
  • Published 2008
  • History
  • Immigrants & Minorities
  • The First World War is often understood in terms of familiar paradigms: western front trench stalemate; the brutalisation of millions of conscript soldiers; the totalisation of industrial warfare or the mass mobilisation of societies. Each of these structural processes played a role in determining the evolution of the conflict and marked an important break with the pre1914 world. They also established new continuities: if, as the historian Omer Bartov has argued, the First World War marked the… CONTINUE READING
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