A Meta-Analysis of Performance Response Under Thermal Stressors

@article{Hancock2007AMO,
  title={A Meta-Analysis of Performance Response Under Thermal Stressors},
  author={Peter A. Hancock and Jennifer M. Ross and James L. Szalma},
  journal={Human Factors: The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomic Society},
  year={2007},
  volume={49},
  pages={851 - 877}
}
Objective: Quantify the effect of thermal stressors on human performance. Background: Most reviews of the effect of environmental stressors on human performance are qualitative. A quantitative review provides a stronger aid in advancing theory and practice. Method: Meta-analytic methods were applied to the available literature on thermal stressors and performance. A total of 291 references were collected. Forty-nine publications met the selection criteria, providing 528 effect sizes for… 

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This paper discusses the current state of knowledge on the effects of heat stress on cognitive performance and summarized a number of exposure limits, with a special emphasis on the most recent one derived by Hancock and Vasmatzidis.
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