A Mesozoic gliding mammal from northeastern China

@article{Meng2006AMG,
  title={A Mesozoic gliding mammal from northeastern China},
  author={Jin Meng and Yaoming Hu and Yuanqing Wang and Xiaolin Wang and Chuankui Li},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={444},
  pages={889-893}
}
Gliding flight has independently evolved many times in vertebrates. Direct evidence of gliding is rare in fossil records and is unknown in mammals from the Mesozoic era. Here we report a new Mesozoic mammal from Inner Mongolia, China, that represents a previously unknown group characterized by a highly specialized insectivorous dentition and a sizable patagium (flying membrane) for gliding flight. The patagium is covered with dense hair and supported by an elongated tail and limbs; the latter… Expand
Mesozoic mammals of China: implications for phylogeny and early evolution of mammals
TLDR
The superb specimens from nearly all major groups of Mesozoic mammals in China provided a great amount of information that contributed to understanding on some major issues in phylogeny and the early evolution of mammals, such as divergences of mammals and the evolution of the mammalian middle ear. Expand
An arboreal docodont from the Jurassic and mammaliaform ecological diversification
TLDR
A new docodontan mammaliaform from the Middle Jurassic of China has skeletal features for climbing and dental characters indicative of an omnivorous diet that included plant sap, revealing a greater ecological diversity in an early mammaliaforms clade at a more fundamental taxonomic level not only between major clades as previously thought. Expand
A new darwinopteran pterosaur reveals arborealism and an opposed thumb
TLDR
A new darwinopteran pterosaur that inhabited a unique forest ecosystem from the Jurassic of China is reported, which exhibits the oldest record of palmar opposition of the pollex, which is unprecedented for pterosaurs and represents a sophisticated adaptation related to arboreal locomotion. Expand
A Cretaceous eutriconodont and integument evolution in early mammals
TLDR
A 125-million-year-old eutriconodontan mammal from Spain with extraordinary preservation of skin and pelage that extends the record of key mammalian integumentary features into the Mesozoic era is reported. Expand
Palaeobiogeography of mesozoic mammals - revisited
The fossil record of mammals in the Mesozoic is decidedly meagre in comparison to that of the Cainozoic, but some useful generalisations can be drawn about the biogeographic history of this groupExpand
New Jurassic mammaliaform sheds light on early evolution of mammal-like hyoid bones
TLDR
A Jurassic fossil shows that early premammalian ancestors possessed hyoids similar to those seen in mammals today, and a new Jurassic docodontan mammaliaform found in China that is preserved with the hyoid bones is reported. Expand
Mid-Mesozoic Flea-like Ectoparasites of Feathered or Haired Vertebrates
TLDR
Large body size and long serrated stylets for piercing tough and thick skin or hides of hosts suggest that these primitive ectoparasites might have lived on and sucked the blood of relatively large hosts, such as contemporaneous feathered dinosaurs and/or pterosaurs or medium-sized mammals (found in the Early Cretaceous, but not the Middle Jurassic). Expand
Earliest Evolution of Multituberculate Mammals Revealed by a New Jurassic Fossil
TLDR
A new basal multi is described from a nearly complete skeleton that shows that the underpinnings of these adaptations arose early in the evolution of the order, setting the stage for the major diversification and radiation of the group that came during the Cretaceous and Paleogene. Expand
The Vertebrates of the Jurassic Daohugou Biota of Northeastern China
TLDR
The Daohugou Biota and the Jehol Biota are two successive Lagerstätte assemblages that collectively offer a taphonomically consistent window into the Mesozoic life of northeast Asia over a significant span of geologic time. Expand
Gliding Mammals: Taxonomy of Living and Extinct Species
TLDR
The flying squirrels of the tribe Pteromyini within the rodent family Sciuridae represent the greatest diversity of gliding mammals, with a total of 48 species in 15 genera currently recognized, and occur throughout Asia, Europe, and North America. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 55 REFERENCES
Oldest fossil record of gliding in rodents
TLDR
The fossil record of eomyids consists almost exclusively of teeth, with the postcranial skeleton being virtually unknown, and its soft body outline strongly suggests the existence of gliding membranes, which makes it the fourth family of rodents with representatives capable ofgliding locomotion. Expand
A Swimming Mammaliaform from the Middle Jurassic and Ecomorphological Diversification of Early Mammals
TLDR
This fossil demonstrates that some mammaliaforms, or proximal relatives to modern mammals, developed diverse locomotory and feeding adaptations and were ecomorphologically different from the majority of generalized small terrestrial Mesozoic mammalian insectivores. Expand
An Early Cretaceous Tribosphenic Mammal and Metatherian Evolution
TLDR
New data from this fossil support the view that Asia was likely the center for the diversification of the earliest metatherians and eutherians during the Early Cretaceous. Expand
Large Mesozoic mammals fed on young dinosaurs
Mesozoic mammals are commonly portrayed as shrewor ratsized animals that were mainly insectivorous, probably nocturnal and lived in the shadow of dinosaurs. The largest known Mesozoic mammalExpand
A Chinese triconodont mammal and mosaic evolution of the mammalian skeleton.
TLDR
The derived pectoral girdle of this new triconodont indicates that homoplasies are as common in the postcranial skeleton as they are in the skull and dentition in the evolution of Mesozoic mammals. Expand
The earliest known eutherian mammal
TLDR
The skeleton of a eutherian (placental) mammal found in northeastern China has limb and foot features that are known only from scansorial and arboreal extant mammals, in contrast to the terrestrial or cursorial features of other Cretaceous eutherians. Expand
Gliding behaviour and palaeoecology of the alleged primate family Paromomyidae (Mammalia, Dermoptera)
TLDR
Newly discovered fossils representing the paromomyid genera Phenacolemur and Ignacius show that these animals share functionally important postcranial synapomorphies with extant Cynocephalus (the flying lemur), the only living member of the mammalian order Dermoptera. Expand
A new symmetrodont mammal from China and its implications for mammalian evolution
TLDR
This analysis suggests that this new taxon represents a part of the early therian radiation before the divergence of living marsupials and placentals; that therians and multituberculates are more closely related to each other than either group is to other mammalian lineages. Expand
Origin and Evolution of Gliding in Early Cenozoic Dermoptera (Mammalia, Primatomorpha)
Aside from the acquisition of powered flight in bats and the aquatic habits of whales, few mammalian life-styles have led to more drastic alterations of the postcranial skeleton than the evolution ofExpand
Grasping Primate Origins
TLDR
It is inferred that the ancestor of Euprimates was primitively an arboreal grasper adapted for terminal branch feeding rather than a specialized leaper or visually directed predator. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...