A Matter of Individuality

@article{Hull1978AMO,
  title={A Matter of Individuality},
  author={David L. Hull},
  journal={Philosophy of Science},
  year={1978},
  volume={45},
  pages={335 - 360}
}
  • D. Hull
  • Published 1 September 1978
  • Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Science
Biological species have been treated traditionally as spatiotemporally unrestricted classes. If they are to perform the function which they do in the evolutionary process, they must be spatiotemporally localized individuals, historical entities. Reinterpreting biological species as historical entities solves several important anomalies in biology, in philosophy of biology, and within philosophy itself. It also has important implications for any attempt to present an "evolutionary" analysis of… 

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  • Philosophy
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  • 1980
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This paper argues that the taxa identified as species by the Phylogenetic Species Concept are the units of biological organization most causally relevant to the evolutionary process but that such “units” exist at multiple levels within the hierarchy of any phylogenetic lineage.

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Organisms or biological individuals? Combining physiological and evolutionary individuality

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The Herd as a Means

  • D. Hull
  • Psychology
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  • 1980
Many of the objections to the sociobiological research program arise from putative peculiarities of human beings and human societies when many of them actually arise from the nature of hierarchically
...

References

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Science and technology during the past half century have been so preoccupied with reductionism that supraindividual systems have suffered benign neglect and, as a result, today the authors have only half a science of man.

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The development of thought since Aristotle could be summed up by saying that every discipline as long as it used the Aristotelian method of definition has remained arrested in a state of empty verbiage and barren scholasticism.
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