A MATHEMATICIAN LOOKS AT LATIN CONJUGATION

@inproceedings{Lambek1979AML,
  title={A MATHEMATICIAN LOOKS AT LATIN CONJUGATION},
  author={Jim Lambek},
  year={1979}
}
It is perhaps only fitting that a mathematician should take a look at the Latin verb, as generations of mathematicians were first exposed to mathematical rigour when learning to conjugate the verb AMO. The Latin verb exhibits in general 90 inflected forms: 15 simple tenses x 6 persons. We disregard imperatives, infinitives, participles, gerunds and compound tenses. These 90 forms may more conveniently be arranged in three matrices displaying 30 forms each. Thus, to most verbs V we associate the… 
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References

Introduction to the mathematics of language study