A Lunar Waterworld

@article{Lucey2009ALW,
  title={A Lunar Waterworld},
  author={P. Lucey},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={326},
  pages={531 - 532}
}
  • P. Lucey
  • Published 2009
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Science
Space-based spectroscopic measurements provide strong evidence for water on the surface of the Moon. Since the first sample return missions of the 1960s, lunar scientists have operated under the presumption that the Moon is entirely dry. Three papers in this week's issue challenge that notion: Infrared spectroscopic measurements of the lunar surface from spacecraft provide unambiguous evidence for the presence of hydroxyl (OH) or water (1–3). 
Influence of the lunar ambience on dynamic surface hydration on sunlit regions of the Moon
Abstract The accepted paradigm of a dry Moon has been upset by the recent detection of a wet Moon. EPOXI, NASA’s extended mission for the Deep Impact spacecraft, observed and quantified dynamicExpand
Vertical Transport of Lunar Regolith and Ice Particles Using Electrodynamic Traveling Wave
AbstractThe existence of water (ice) has been discovered in the polar regions of the Moon, and it is expected to be used to support life for astronauts and to provide the raw material of hydrogen a...
Geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Moon: Status of current understanding
The Moon is key to understanding both Earth and our Solar System in terms of planetary processes and has been a witness of the Solar System history for more than 4.5 Ga. Building on earlierExpand
Circular polarization ratio characteristics of impact craters from Mini-RF observations and implications for ice detection at the polar regions of the Moon
[1] In an attempt to reduce the ambiguity on radar detection of water ice at the permanently shadowed regions near the lunar poles, radar echo strength and circular polarization ratio (CPR) of impactExpand
Long-Range Magnetic Transport of Regolith Particles Using Multistage Coil Gun on Moon and Mars
AbstractA magnetic transport system for regolith particles on the Moon and Mars was developed, taking advantage of the fact that lunar and Martian regolith particles are magnetic. A multistage coil...
New results and questions of lunar exploration from SELENE, Chang’E-1, Chandrayaan-1 and LRO/LCROSS
Abstract The moon has longstanding questions such as lunar environments, origin, formation and evolution, magnetization of crustal rocks, internal structure and possible life. The recent lunarExpand
Signatures of volatiles in the lunar proton albedo
Abstract We find evidence for hydrated material in the lunar regolith using “albedo protons” measured with the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) on the Lunar ReconnaissanceExpand
Unravelling the Mystery of Lunar Anomalous Craters Using Radar and Infrared Observations
In Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini‐RF) radar images, anomalous craters are those having a high circular polarization ratio (CPR) in their interior but not exterior to their rims. Previous studiesExpand
Organic Molecules in Lunar Ice: A Window to the Early Evolution of Life on Earth
Water ice at the lunar poles likely contains organic molecules that provide insights into the early evolution of life on Earth and cometary composition. In fact, since meteorite impacts on Earth mayExpand
Lunarport: A proposed Lunar-resource station to expand deep-space travel horizons
Deep-space travel is limited by the costly voyage to leave Earth's atmosphere and gravitational pull. The volume of propellants per unit mass of the payload required for that segment constrains theExpand
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 11 REFERENCES
Temporal and Spatial Variability of Lunar Hydration As Observed by the Deep Impact Spacecraft
TLDR
Analysis of recent infrared mapping by Chandrayaan-1 and Deep Impact and reexamining Cassini data obtained during its early flyby of the Moon reveals a noticeable absorption signal for H2O and OH across much of the surface, suggesting solar wind is depositing and/or somehow forming water and OH in minerals near the lunar surface, and that this trapped water is dynamic. Expand
The Poles of the Moon
The lunar poles feature a microenvironment that is almost entirely unknown to planetary science. Because of the very small tilt of the Moon's axis with respect to the Sun, craters and otherExpand
Detection of Adsorbed Water and Hydroxyl on the Moon
TLDR
Space-based spectroscopic measurements provide evidence for water or hydroxyl (OH) on the surface of the Moon and imply that solar wind is depositing and/or somehow forming water and OH in minerals near the lunar surface, and that this trapped water is dynamic. Expand
Character and Spatial Distribution of OH/H2O on the Surface of the Moon Seen by M3 on Chandrayaan-1
TLDR
Analysis of recent infrared mapping by Chandrayaan-1 and Deep Impact, and reexamining Cassini data obtained during its early flyby of the Moon, Pieters et al. reveal a noticeable absorption signal for H2O and OH across much of the surface, implying that solar wind is depositing and/or somehow forming water and OH in minerals near the lunar surface, and that this trapped water is dynamic. Expand
Volatile content of lunar volcanic glasses and the presence of water in the Moon’s interior
TLDR
The results indicate that, contrary to prevailing ideas, the bulk Moon might not be entirely depleted in highly volatile elements, including water, and the presence of water must be considered in models constraining the Moon’s formation and its thermal and chemical evolution. Expand
Near-Surface Temperatures on Mercury and the Moon and the Stability of Polar Ice Deposits☆
Abstract In order to assess the thermal stability of polar ice deposits, we present model calculated temperatures of flat surfaces and surfaces within bowl-shaped and flat-floored polar impactExpand
Stability of polar frosts in spherical bowl-shaped craters on the Moon, Mercury, and Mars
Following Svitek (Martian Water Frost: Control of Global Distribution by Small-Scale Processes, Ph.D Thesis, California Institute of Technology, 1992), analytic solutions are presented for theExpand
Near-Surface Ice on Mercury and the Moon: A Topographic Thermal Model
Abstract A thermal model that can be easily adapted to craters of arbitrary shape is developed and applied to high-latitude impact craters on Mercury and the Moon, Chao Meng Fu crater at -87.5°L onExpand
Identification of the Hydrated Iron Oxide Mineral Akaganéite in Apollo 16 Lunar Rocks
Apollo 16 rocks contain rustlike alteration. A mass of rust-colored, iron-rich crystals forming a grain 30 µm in diameter in rock 66095 has been identified by x-ray diffraction as akaganeite (βExpand
Zinc, lead, chlorine and FeOOH-bearing assemblages in the Apollo 16 sample 66095: Origin by impact of a comet or a carbonaceous chondrite?
Abstract Sample 66095, 89 collected from station 6 from the lunar Highlands in the Descartes Site shows evidence of mild to severe shock. These shock features are accompanied by an unusual enrichmentExpand
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