A Long and Unfortunate Voyage Towards the 'Invention' of the Melanesia/Polynesia Distinction 1595-1832* * Translated from French by Isabel Ollivier

@article{Distinction2003ALA,
  title={A Long and Unfortunate Voyage Towards the 'Invention' of the Melanesia/Polynesia Distinction 1595-1832* * Translated from French by Isabel Ollivier},
  author={Distinction and S. Tcherk{\'e}zoff},
  journal={The Journal of Pacific History},
  year={2003},
  volume={38},
  pages={175 - 196}
}
Dumont d’Urville has been credited in the popular imagination with inventing a four part division of Oceania: Malaysia, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia. In actuality, he was developing and popularising names already in existence in the scientific literature. Furthermore, his aim was more to contribute to a ‘theory of races’ than to add names for the sake of cartography. This paper examines the intellectual climate of the time, and the writers whose formulations were the precursors of the… Expand
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References

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Note that 'frizzy, woolly' hair is even worse than simply 'frizzy'. Forster added a long note to explain his theory
    The 'Negroes' have frizzy, woolly hair because each hair grows out of a smaller root than is found in other men, and so is finer. Abundant perspiration makes it woolly
      The idea of degeneration due to climate is already in Buffon's work
      • Anthropologie et histoire