A Letter Signed: The Very Beginnings of Dalton's Atomic Theory

@article{Pratt2010ALS,
  title={A Letter Signed: The Very Beginnings of Dalton's Atomic Theory},
  author={Herbert T. Pratt},
  journal={Ambix},
  year={2010},
  volume={57},
  pages={301 - 310}
}
Abstract This paper explores the provenance and content of a previously unknown personal letter by John Dalton (1766–1844), which is dated 12 April 1803. It relates to a startling breakthrough in Dalton's research, which pre-dates by five months the earliest date in his laboratory notebook, namely, 6 September 1803. The author acquired the letter about thirty years ago, and now offers it to the public. He makes no attempt to explain how it contributes to — or even changes — our understanding of… 
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