A Jurassic eutherian mammal and divergence of marsupials and placentals

@article{Luo2011AJE,
  title={A Jurassic eutherian mammal and divergence of marsupials and placentals},
  author={Zhe‐Xi Luo and Chongxi Yuan and Qingjin Meng and Qiang Ji},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={476},
  pages={442-445}
}
Placentals are the most abundant mammals that have diversified into every niche for vertebrates and dominated the world’s terrestrial biotas in the Cenozoic. A critical event in mammalian history is the divergence of eutherians, the clade inclusive of all living placentals, from the metatherian–marsupial clade. Here we report the discovery of a new eutherian of 160 Myr from the Jurassic of China, which extends the first appearance of the eutherian–placental clade by about 35 Myr from the… 
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Eutheria (Placental Mammals)
TLDR
Eutheria includes one of three major clades of mammals, the extant members of which are referred to as placentals, the most ecologically diverse group of living vertebrates as they vary greatly in size, locomotory types, and diet.
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