A Jurassic avialan dinosaur from China resolves the early phylogenetic history of birds

@article{Godefroit2013AJA,
  title={A Jurassic avialan dinosaur from China resolves the early phylogenetic history of birds},
  author={Pascal Godefroit and Andrea Cau and Huang Dong-yu and François Escuilli{\'e} and Wu Wenhao and Gareth J. Dyke},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2013},
  volume={498},
  pages={359-362}
}
The recent discovery of small paravian theropod dinosaurs with well-preserved feathers in the Middle–Late Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning Province (northeastern China) has challenged the pivotal position of Archaeopteryx, regarded from its discovery to be the most basal bird. Removing Archaeopteryx from the base of Avialae to nest within Deinonychosauria implies that typical bird flight, powered by the forelimbs only, either evolved at least twice, or was subsequently lost or modified… 

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