A Is for Apple: the Role of Letter-Word Associations in the Development of Grapheme-Colour Synaesthesia.

@article{Mankin2017AIF,
  title={A Is for Apple: the Role of Letter-Word Associations in the Development of Grapheme-Colour Synaesthesia.},
  author={Jennifer L. Mankin and Julia Simner},
  journal={Multisensory research},
  year={2017},
  volume={30 3-5},
  pages={
          409-446
        }
}
This study investigates the origins of specific letter-colour associations experienced by people with grapheme-colour synaesthesia. We present novel evidence that frequently observed trends in synaesthesia (e.g., A is typically red) can be tied to orthographic associations between letters and words (e.g., 'A is for apple'), which are typically formed during literacy acquisition. In our experiments, we first tested members of the general population to show that certain words are consistently… Expand
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