A High-Coverage Genome Sequence from an Archaic Denisovan Individual

@article{Meyer2012AHG,
  title={A High-Coverage Genome Sequence from an Archaic Denisovan Individual},
  author={Matthias Meyer and Martin Kircher and Marie-Theres Gansauge and Heng Li and Fernando Racimo and Swapan Mallick and Joshua G. Schraiber and Flora Jay and Kay Pr{\"u}fer and Cesare de Filippo and Peter H. Sudmant and Can Alkan and Qiaomei Fu and Ron Do and Nadin Rohland and Arti Tandon and Michael F. Siebauer and Richard E. Green and Katarzyna Bryc and Adrian W. Briggs and Udo Stenzel and Jesse Dabney and Jay A. Shendure and Jacob O. Kitzman and Michael F. Hammer and Michael V. Shunkov and Anatoli P. Derevianko and Nick J. Patterson and Aida M. Andr{\'e}s and Evan E. Eichler and Montgomery Slatkin and David Reich and Janet Kelso and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={338},
  pages={222 - 226}
}
Ancient Genomics The Denisovans were archaic humans closely related to Neandertals, whose populations overlapped with the ancestors of modern-day humans. Using a single-stranded library preparation method, Meyer et al. (p. 222, published online 30 August) provide a detailed analysis of a high-quality Denisovan genome. The genomic sequence provides evidence for very low rates of heterozygosity in the Denisova, probably not because of recent inbreeding, but instead because of a small population… 
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