A Haemophilus influenzae IgA protease‐like protein promotes intimate interaction with human epithelial cells

@article{StGeme1994AHI,
  title={A Haemophilus influenzae IgA protease‐like protein promotes intimate interaction with human epithelial cells},
  author={Joseph W. St. Geme and Stanley Falkow},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={1994},
  volume={14}
}
Haemophilus influenzae represents a common cause of human disease and an important source of morbidity and mortality. Disease caused by this organism begins with colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Several studies indicate that H. influenzae is capable of binding to and entering cultured human cells, properties which are potentially of relevance to the process of colonization. In the present study, we isolated an H. influenzae gene designated hap, which is associated with the capacity… Expand
Haemophilus influenzae adhesins and the innate immune response
TLDR
The work presented in this thesis shows that Hsf may prolong the bacterial survival by interacting with the complement regulator vitronectin and the novel protein PE has been isolated, characterized and shown to be important for interactions of H. influenzae with the innate immune system. Expand
The Haemophilus influenzae Hia Adhesin Is an Autotransporter Protein That Remains Uncleaved at the C Terminus and Fully Cell Associated
TLDR
The mechanism of Hia secretion is examined and it is suggested that Hia is the prototype of an important subfamily of autotransporter proteins. Expand
Molecular determinants of the interaction between Haemophilus influenzae and human cells.
  • J. W. Geme
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
  • 1996
TLDR
The authors' current understanding of H. influenzae type b and nontypable H. Influenzae adhesins is reviewed and models are proposed for the interrelationship of these molecules. Expand
Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae exploits the interaction between protein-E and vitronectin for the adherence and invasion to bronchial epithelial cells
TLDR
Bacterial protein-E and host vitronectin play a role in the attachment to bronchial epithelial cells and is also involved in the subsequent intracellular invasion of NTHi. Expand
Human milk lactoferrin inactivates two putative colonization factors expressed by Haemophilus influenzae.
TLDR
It is suggested that human milk lactoferrin may attenuate the pathogenic potential of H. influenzae by selectively inactivating IgA1 protease and Hap, thereby interfering with colonization. Expand
Opacity-Associated Protein A Contributes to the Binding of Haemophilus influenzae to Chang Epithelial Cells
TLDR
OapA mediates attachment to Chang epithelial cells examined by using genetically defined type b and nontypeable H. influenzae strains with or without OapA, and it is demonstrated that Oap a plays a role in H. Influenzae binding to human conjunctival epithel cells. Expand
Roles of Secreted Virulence Factors in Pathogenicity of Haemophilus Influenzae: A Dissertation
TLDR
Insight is provided into requirements for H. influenzae to survive within various host environments by examining factors which might be important for mediating critical virulence aspects and discovering novel virulence factors including those important for heme and zinc acquisition, as well as resistance to complement. Expand
Characterization of the genetic locus encoding Haemophilus influenzae type b surface fibrils
TLDR
It is determined that the fibril locus is composed of one long open reading frame, designated hsf, which encodes a protein (Hsf) with a molecular mass of approximately 240 kDa that plays an important role in the process of respiratory tract colonization by H. influenzae. Expand
Immunization with Haemophilus influenzae Hap adhesin protects against nasopharyngeal colonization in experimental mice.
Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a common cause of respiratory tract disease and initiates infection by colonizing the nasopharynx. The H. influenzae Hap adhesin is an autotransporter proteinExpand
The Haemophilus influenzae Hap serine protease promotes adherence and microcolony formation, potentiated by a soluble host protein.
TLDR
It is found that the uncleaved cell-associated form of Hap mediates adherence to cultured epithelial cells and promotes bacterial aggregation and microcolony formation, suggesting a novel paradigm in host-pathogen relations, in which a soluble host protein whose primary function is to protect host epithelium potentiates properties that facilitate bacterial colonization. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 112 REFERENCES
Haemophilus influenzae adheres to and enters cultured human epithelial cells
TLDR
It is speculated that H. influenzae entry into epithelial cells may provide a mechanism for evasion of host defenses, thereby allowing persistence in the nasopharynx and several candidate adhesin molecules are identified. Expand
DO PILI PLAY A ROLE IN PATHOGENICITY OF HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B?
TLDR
Among many Hib strains from cerebrospinal fluid, blood, or the nasopharynx, two isolates from NP were found to be exceptionally adherent and displayed pili, not previously described for Hib or other encapsulated H. influenzae. Expand
High-molecular-weight proteins of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae mediate attachment to human epithelial cells.
TLDR
Results indicate that both H MW-1 and HMW-2 and the homologous proteins from a second strain can mediate attachment and speculate that these proteins and the related proteins in other nontypable H. influenzae isolates are important colonization factors. Expand
A comparative genetic study of serologically distinct Haemophilus influenzae type 1 immunoglobulin A1 proteases
TLDR
Analysis of the homologies among the four iga genes indicates that the variation results from transformation and subsequent homologous recombination in the iga gene region among H. influenzae strains, which suggests that this variation is caused by epitopes of the discontinuous conformational type. Expand
Surface structures and adherence properties of diverse strains of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius
TLDR
Investigating the surface structures and adherence properties of eight different strains of H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius found short, thin, surface fibers distinct from long pili and demonstrated efficient attachment to cultured human conjunctival cells, suggesting a nonproteinaceous hemagglutinin. Expand
Interaction of Haemophilus influenzae with human erythrocytes and oropharyngeal epithelial cells is mediated by a common fimbrial epitope.
TLDR
Results indicate that fimbriae are involved in adherence and HA and that the binding site for the monoclonal antibodies on the fimbRIae is not common on all strains. Expand
Interaction of Haemophilus influenzae with human erythrocytes and oropharyngeal epithelial cells is mediated by a common fimbrial epitope
TLDR
Results indicate that fimbriae are involved in adherence and HA and that the binding site for the monoclonal antibodies on the fimbRIae is not common on all strains. Expand
Gene structure and extracellular secretion of Neisseria gonorrhoeae IgA protease
TLDR
A model in which the helper serves as a pore for excretion of the protease domain through the outer membrane of IgA protease acquires an active conformation as its extracellular transport proceeds and is released as a proform from the membrane-bound helper by autoproteolysis. Expand
Interaction of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae with human respiratory mucosa in vitro.
TLDR
Fimbriation of H. influenzae increased buccal cell adherence but did not facilitate association with normal respiratory epithelium and failed to increase epithelial damage or association with damaged cells. Expand
Pilus- and non-pilus-mediated interactions of Haemophilus influenzae type b with human erythrocytes and human nasopharyngeal mucosa.
TLDR
While P +HA+ and P-HA- Hib both attached to NP mucosa, P+HA+ strains may have a selective advantage in mucosal colonization but P- HA- strains may be more invasive. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...