A Genetically Encoded Optical Probe of Membrane Voltage

@article{Siegel1997AGE,
  title={A Genetically Encoded Optical Probe of Membrane Voltage},
  author={M. Siegel and E. Isacoff},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={1997},
  volume={19},
  pages={735-741}
}
Measuring electrical activity in large numbers of cells with high spatial and temporal resolution is a fundamental problem for the study of neural development and information processing. To address this problem, we have constructed a novel, genetically encoded probe that can be used to measure transmembrane voltage in single cells. We fused a modified green fluorescent protein (GFP) into a voltage-sensitive K+ channel so that voltage-dependent rearrangements in the K+ channel would induce… Expand
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