A Female Style in Corporate Leadership? Evidence from Quotas

@article{Matsa2012AFS,
  title={A Female Style in Corporate Leadership? Evidence from Quotas},
  author={David A. Matsa and Amalia R. Miller},
  journal={Corporate Governance \& Management eJournal},
  year={2012}
}
This paper studies the impact of gender quotas for corporate board seats on corporate decisions. We examine the introduction of Norway's 2006 quota, comparing affected firms to other Nordic companies, public and private, that are unaffected by the rule. We find that affected firms undertake fewer workforce reductions than comparison firms, increasing relative labor costs and employment levels and reducing short-term profits. The effects are strongest among firms without female board members… Expand
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Around the world, policy makers are mandating gender quotas for boards of publicly-traded firms. Since the benefits and costs of these quotas accrue to shareholders, it is important to see how theyExpand
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Does Gender Matter in the Boardroom? Evidence from the Market Reaction to Mandatory New Director Announcements
Around the world, policy makers are mandating gender quotas for boards of publicly-traded firms. Since the benefits and costs of these quotas accrue to shareholders, it is important to see how theyExpand
Chipping Away at the Glass Ceiling: Gender Spillovers in Corporate Leadership
This paper examines the role of women helping women in corporate America. Using a merged panel of directors and executives for large U.S. corporations between 1997 and 2009, we find a positiveExpand
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