A Feathered Dinosaur Tail with Primitive Plumage Trapped in Mid-Cretaceous Amber

@article{Xing2016AFD,
  title={A Feathered Dinosaur Tail with Primitive Plumage Trapped in Mid-Cretaceous Amber},
  author={Lida Xing and Ryan C. McKellar and Xing Xu and Gang Li and Ming Bai and W Scott Persons and Tetsuto Miyashita and Michael J. Benton and Jianping Zhang and Alexander P. Wolfe and Qiru Yi and Kuowei Tseng and Hao Ran and Philip J. Currie},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2016},
  volume={26},
  pages={3352-3360}
}
In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1-3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4-10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, and the… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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