A Fatal Case of Babesiosis in Missouri: Identification of Another Piroplasm That Infects Humans

@article{Herwaldt1996AFC,
  title={A Fatal Case of Babesiosis in Missouri: Identification of Another Piroplasm That Infects Humans},
  author={Barbara L. Herwaldt and David H. Persing and Eric Pr{\'e}cigout and Will L. Goff and Dane A. Mathiesen and P. Taylor and Mark L. Eberhard and Andr{\'e} Gorenflot},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={1996},
  volume={124},
  pages={643-650}
}
Human cases of the tick-borne disease babesiosis are caused by the bovine parasite Babesia divergens in Europe [1, 2], by the rodent parasite B. microti in the northeastern and upper midwestern United States [2, 3], and by WA1-type piroplasms in Washington and California [4-6]. We describe the first reported zoonotic case of babesiosis acquired in Missouri and provide evidence to show that this fatal case was caused by an intraerythrocytic piroplasm (MO1) that is probably distinct from but… Expand
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