A Fast Radio Burst Discovered in FAST Drift Scan Survey

@article{Zhu2020AFR,
  title={A Fast Radio Burst Discovered in FAST Drift Scan Survey},
  author={Weiwei Zhu and Di Li and Rui Luo and Chenchen Miao and Bing Zhang and Laura G. Spitler and Duncan R. Lorimer and Michael Kramer and David J. Champion and Youling Yue and Andrew D. Cameron and Marilyn Cruces and Ran Duan and Yi Feng and Jun Han and George Hobbs and Chenhui Niu and Jiarui Niu and Zhi-chen Pan and Lei Qian and D. Shi and Ning-yu Tang and Pei Wang and Hongfeng Wang and Mao Yuan and Lei Zhang and Xinxin Zhang and Shu-Yu Cao and Li Feng and Heng-qian Gan and Long Gao and Xuedong Gu and Minglei Guo and Qiaoli Hao and Lin Huang and Menglin Huang and Peng Jiang and Chengjin Jin and Hui Li and Qi Li and Qisheng Li and Hongfei Liu and Gaofeng Pan and Bo Peng and Huirong Qian and Xiangwei Shi and Jinyuo Song and Liqiang Song and Caihong Sun and Jinghai Sun and Hong Wang and Qiming Wang and Yi Wang and Xiaoyao Xie and Jun Yan and Li Yang and Shi-mo Yang and Rui Yao and Dongjun Yu and Jinglong Yu and Chengmin Zhang and Haiyan Zhang and Shuxin Zhang and Xiaonian Zheng and Aiying Zhou and Bo Zhu and Lichun Zhu and Ming Zhu and Wenbai Zhu and Yan Zhu},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={2020},
  volume={895}
}
We report the discovery of a highly dispersed fast radio burst (FRB), FRB 181123, from an analysis of ∼1500 hr of drift scan survey data taken using the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST). The pulse has three distinct emission components, which vary with frequency across our 1.0–1.5 GHz observing band. We measure the peak flux density to be >0.065 Jy and the corresponding fluence >0.2 Jy ms. Based on the observed dispersion measure of 1812 cm−3 pc, we infer a redshift… 

Statistical properties of fast radio bursts elucidate their origins: magnetars are favored over gamma-ray bursts

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are extremely strong radio flares lasting several milliseconds, most of which come from unidentified objects at a cosmological distance. They can be apparently repeating or

CRAFTS for Fast Radio Bursts: Extending the Dispersion–Fluence Relation with New FRBs Detected by FAST

We report three new FRBs discovered by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), namely FRB 181017.J0036+11, FRB 181118, and FRB 181130, through the Commensal Radio Astronomy

Luminosity distribution of fast radio bursts from CHIME/FRB Catalog 1 by means of the updated Macquart relation

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are extremely strong radio flares lasting several micro- to milliseconds and come from unidentified objects at cosmological distances, most of which are only seen once. Based

Luminosity distribution of fast radio bursts from CHIME/FRB Catalog 1 by the updated Macquart relation

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are extremely strong radio flares lasting several milliseconds and come from unidentified objects at cosmological distances, most of which are only seen once. Based on recently

The discovery and scientific potential of fast radio bursts

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-time-scale bursts of coherent radio emission that are luminous enough to be detectable at cosmological distances. In this Review, I describe the discovery of

Constraints on Compact Dark Matter with Fast Radio Burst Observations

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are bright radio transients with millisecond duration at cosmological distances. Since compact dark matter/objects (COs) could act as lenses and cause splitting of these

Constraints on Optical Emission of FAST-detected FRB 20181130B with GWAC Synchronized Observations

Multiwavelength simultaneous observations are essential to the constraints on the origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs). However, it is a significant observational challenge due to the nature of FRBs as

On the Magnetospheric Origin of Repeating Fast Radio Bursts

A bright radio burst was newly discovered in SGR 1935+2154, which exhibits some fast radio burst (FRB)-like temporal and frequency properties, suggesting a neutron star (NS)/magnetar magnetospheric

The Large Dispersion and Scattering of FRB 20190520B Are Dominated by the Host Galaxy

The repeating fast radio burst FRB 20190520B is localized to a galaxy at z = 0.241, much closer than expected given its dispersion measure DM = 1205 ± 4 pc cm−3. Here we assess implications of the

Long and Short Fast Radio Bursts Are Different from Repeating and Nonrepeating Transients

We collect 133 fast radio bursts (FRBs), including 110 nonrepeating and 23 repeating ones, and systematically investigate their observational properties. To check the frequency dependence of FRB

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 52 REFERENCES

FAST RADIO BURST DISCOVERED IN THE ARECIBO PULSAR ALFA SURVEY

Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising

Faint Repetitions from a Bright Fast Radio Burst Source

We report the detection of repeat bursts from the source of FRB 171019, one of the brightest fast radio bursts (FRBs) detected in the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) fly’s eye

Fast Radio Burst Energetics and Detectability from High Redshifts

We estimate the upper limit redshifts of known fast radio bursts (FRBs) using the dispersion measure (DM)-redshift (z) relation and derive the upper limit peak luminosity Lp and energy E of FRBs

A second source of repeating fast radio bursts

The detection of six repeat bursts from FRB 180814.J0422+73, one of the 13 FRBs detected by the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) FRB project, suggests that there exists—and that CHIME/FRB and other wide-field, sensitive radio telescopes will find—a substantial population of repeating FRBs.

A second source of repeating fast radio bursts

The discovery of a repeating fast radio burst (FRB) source1,2, FRB 121102, eliminated models involving cataclysmic events for this source. No other repeating FRB has hitherto been detected despite

Dense magnetized plasma associated with a fast radio burst

The examination of archival data revealing Faraday rotation in the fast radio burst FRB 110523 is reported, indicating magnetization in the vicinity of the source itself or within a host galaxy.

CHIME/FRB Discovery of Eight New Repeating Fast Radio Burst Sources

We report on the discovery of eight repeating fast radio burst (FRB) sources found using the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) telescope. These sources span a dispersion measure

The dispersion–brightness relation for fast radio bursts from a wide-field survey

A large-scale survey of fast radio bursts—short pulses of radio waves that seem to come from cosmological distances—finds 20 events, including both the nearest and the most energetic bursts observed so far, and demonstrates that there is a relationship between burst dispersion and brightness.

Five new fast radio bursts from the HTRU high-latitude survey at Parkes: First evidence for two-component bursts

The detection of five new fast radio bursts (FRBs) found in the 1.4-GHz High Time Resolution Universe high-latitude survey at Parkes, is presented. The rate implied is 7(-3)(+5) x 10(3) (95 per cent)

On the origin of a highly dispersed coherent radio burst

We discuss the possible source of a highly dispersed radio transient discovered in the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey (PMPS). The pulse has a dispersion measure of 746 cm-3 pc, a peak flux density of
...