A Fast Bow Shock Location Predictor‐Estimator From 2D and 3D Analytical Models: Application to Mars and the MAVEN Mission

@article{Wedlund2021AFB,
  title={A Fast Bow Shock Location Predictor‐Estimator From 2D and 3D Analytical Models: Application to Mars and the MAVEN Mission},
  author={Cyril Simon Wedlund and Martin Volwerk and Arnaud Beth and Christian Xavier Mazelle and Christian Mostl and Jasper S. Halekas and Jacob R. Gruesbeck and Diana Rojas-Castillo},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics},
  year={2021},
  volume={127}
}
We present fast algorithms to automatically estimate the statistical position of the bow shock from spacecraft data, using existing analytical two‐dimensional (2D) and three‐dimensional (3D) models of the shock surface. We derive expressions of the standoff distances in 2D and 3D and of the normal to the bow shock at any given point on it. Two simple bow shock detection algorithms are constructed, one solely based on a geometrical predictor from existing models, the other using this predicted… 

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