A Family Affair?: English Hangmen and a Dublin Jail, 1923–54

@article{ODonnell2014AFA,
  title={A Family Affair?: English Hangmen and a Dublin Jail, 1923–54},
  author={Ian O’Donnell and David M. Doyle},
  journal={New Hibernia Review},
  year={2014},
  volume={18},
  pages={101 - 118}
}
The genealogy of capital punishment in twentieth-century Ireland defies easy articulation, and several aspects of the practice appear especially perplexing in the absence of an appreciation of a precise historical context. It is puzzling, for instance, that Irish politicians couched arguments favoring the retention of capital punishment in terms of its perceived efficacy as a deterrent to potential subversives when the death penalty was imposed almost exclusively for non-political civilian… 
3 Citations
Republicans, Martyrology, and the Death Penalty in Britain and Ireland, 1939–1990
  • D. Doyle
  • History, Law
    Journal of British Studies
  • 2015
Abstract This article examines the relationship between politically motivated murder, martyrdom, and the death penalty in Britain and Ireland in the period from 1939 to 1990. First, it investigates
“On the other hand the accused is a woman…”: Women and the Death Penalty in Post-Independence Ireland
Hannah Flynn was sentenced to death on February 27, 1924. She had been convicted of the murder of Margaret O'Sullivan, her former employer. Hannah worked for Margaret and her husband Daniel as a
Nonhuman Animal Pain and Capital Punishment in Beckett’s “Dante and the Lobster”
This article offers a fresh examination of the representation of nonhuman animals in Beckett’s early aesthetics, using “Dante and the Lobster” as a case study. Beckett’s story is illuminated by

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES
Republicans, Martyrology, and the Death Penalty in Britain and Ireland, 1939–1990
  • D. Doyle
  • History, Law
    Journal of British Studies
  • 2015
Abstract This article examines the relationship between politically motivated murder, martyrdom, and the death penalty in Britain and Ireland in the period from 1939 to 1990. First, it investigates
The Death Penalty in Post-Independence Ireland
The history of capital punishment in post-Independence Ireland has received scant scholarly attention. This essay is an attempt to set out what can be learned about the executed persons, the
The transformation of Ireland, 1900-2000
A ground-breaking history of the twentieth century in Ireland, written on the most ambitious scale by a brilliant young historian. It is significant that it begins in 1900 and ends in 2000 - most
The Criminal Process
The Criminal Process continues to provides a reflective, contextualized consideration of doctrinal, practical, and normative issues in criminal processes and procedures. The text draws on arguments