A FAST RADIO BURST IN THE DIRECTION OF THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

@article{Ravi2014AFR,
  title={A FAST RADIO BURST IN THE DIRECTION OF THE CARINA DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY},
  author={Vikram Ravi and Ryan M. Shannon and Andrew Jameson},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={2014},
  volume={799}
}
We report the real-time discovery of a fast radio burst (FRB 131104) with the Parkes radio telescope in a targeted observation of the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The dispersion measure of the burst is 779 cm−3 pc, exceeding predictions for the maximum line-of-sight Galactic contribution by a factor of 11. The temporal structure of the burst is characterized by an exponential scattering tail with a timescale of 2.0 ms at 1582 MHz that scales as frequency to the power −4.4 (all uncertainties… 

Figures from this paper

Dense magnetized plasma associated with a fast radio burst

TLDR
The examination of archival data revealing Faraday rotation in the fast radio burst FRB 110523 is reported, indicating magnetization in the vicinity of the source itself or within a host galaxy.

A model of neutron-star–white-dwarf collision for fast radio bursts

  • Xiang Liu
  • Physics
    Astrophysics and Space Science
  • 2018
Fast radio bursts (FRBs) with unknown origin emit a huge luminosity (about 1 Jy at 1 GHz) with a duration of milliseconds or less at extragalactic distances estimated from their large dispersion

The host galaxy of a fast radio burst

TLDR
The discovery of a fast radio burst is reported and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which is used to identify the host galaxy and measure the galaxy’s redshift, which provides a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium.

The dispersion–brightness relation for fast radio bursts from a wide-field survey

TLDR
A large-scale survey of fast radio bursts—short pulses of radio waves that seem to come from cosmological distances—finds 20 events, including both the nearest and the most energetic bursts observed so far, and demonstrates that there is a relationship between burst dispersion and brightness.

Enhanced Rates of Fast Radio Bursts from Galaxy Clusters

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) have so far been detected serendipitously across the sky. We consider the possible enhancement in the FRB rate in the direction of galaxy clusters, and compare the predicted

A Fast Radio Burst Occurs Every Second throughout the Observable Universe

Recent multi-telescope observations of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB) FRB 121102 reveal a Gaussian-like spectral profile and associate the event with a dwarf metal-poor galaxy at a cosmological

The Host Galaxy and Redshift of the Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102

The precise localization of the repeating fast radio burst (FRB 121102) has provided the first unambiguous association (chance coincidence probability p ≲ 3 × 10−4) of an FRB with an optical and

Intensity distribution function and statistical properties of fast radio bursts

Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are intense radio flashes from the sky that are characterized by millisecond durations and Jansky-level flux densities. We carried out a statistical analysis on FRBs that

Radio light curve of the galaxy possibly associated with FRB 150418

We present observations made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) and the Giant Metre-Wave Telescope of the radio source within the galaxy

Are the distributions of fast radio burst properties consistent with a cosmological population

High time resolution radio surveys over the last few years have discovered a population of millisecond-duration transient bursts called fast radio bursts (FRBs), which remain of unknown origin. FRBs
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES

THE GALACTIC POSITION DEPENDENCE OF FAST RADIO BURSTS AND THE DISCOVERY OF FRB011025

We report the detection of a dispersed fast radio burst (FRB) in archival intermediate-latitude Parkes Radio Telescope data. The burst appears to be of the same physical origin as the four purported

Fast Radio Burst Discovered in the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey

Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising

Physical Constraints on Fast Radio Bursts

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated,  ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 103 pc cm−3. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at  GHz frequencies are

A Population of Fast Radio Bursts at Cosmological Distances

TLDR
The detection of four nonrepeating radio transient events with millisecond duration in data from the 64-meter Parkes radio telescope in Australia indicates that these radio bursts had their origin outside the authors' galaxy, but it is not possible to tell what caused them.

Fast radio bursts may originate from nearby flaring stars

Six cases of fast radio bursts (FRBs) have recently been discovered. The FRBs are bright (~0.1 - 1 Jy) and brief (~ 1 ms) pulses of radio emission with dispersion measures (DMs) that exceed Galactic

Short-duration Radio Bursts with Apparent Extragalactic Dispersion

We present the results of the longest yet undertaken search for apparently extragalactic radio bursts at the Bleien Radio Observatory covering 21,000 hr (898 days). The data were searched for events

Fast radio bursts: constraints on the dispersing medium

Fast radio bursts appear to exhibit large dispersion measures, typically exceeding any expected galactic interstellar contribution, especially along the moderate to high-galactic-latitude directions

The millisecond radio sky: transients from a blind single-pulse search

We present the results of a search for transient radio bursts of between 0.125 and 32 ms duration in two archival pulsar surveys of intermediate Galactic latitudes with the Parkes multibeam receiver.

Fast radio bursts: the last sign of supramassive neutron stars

Context. Several fast radio bursts have been discovered recently, showing a bright, highly dispersed millisecond radio pulse. The pulses do not repeat and are not associated with a known pulsar or

A Bright Millisecond Radio Burst of Extragalactic Origin

TLDR
A 30-jansky dispersed burst, less than 5 milliseconds in duration, located 3° from the Small Magellanic Cloud is found, which implies that it was a singular event such as a supernova or coalescence of relativistic objects.