A Dynamic 6,000-Year Genetic History of Eurasia’s Eastern Steppe

@article{Jeong2020AD6,
  title={A Dynamic 6,000-Year Genetic History of Eurasia’s Eastern Steppe},
  author={Choongwon Jeong and Ke Wang and Shevan Wilkin and William Timothy Treal Taylor and Bryan K. Miller and Sodnom Ulziibayar and Raphaela Stahl and Chelsea Chiovelli and Jan Bemmann and Florian Knolle and Nikolay Kradin and Bilikto A. Bazarov and Denis A. Miyagashev and Prokopiy B. Konovalov and Elena Zhambaltarova and Alicia Ventresca Miller and Wolfgang Haak and Stephan Schiffels and Johannes Krause and Nicole Boivin and Erdene Myagmar and Jessica Hendy and Christina G Warinner},
  journal={Cell},
  year={2020},
  volume={183},
  pages={890 - 904.e29}
}

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