A Dual Process Motivational Model of Ambivalent Sexism and Gender Differences in Romantic Partner Preferences

@article{Sibley2011ADP,
  title={A Dual Process Motivational Model of Ambivalent Sexism and Gender Differences in Romantic Partner Preferences},
  author={Chris G. Sibley and Nickola C. Overall},
  journal={Psychology of Women Quarterly},
  year={2011},
  volume={35},
  pages={303 - 317}
}
We tested a dual process motivational model of ambivalent sexism and gender differences in intimate partner preferences. Meta-analysis of 32 samples (16 with men, 16 with women; N = 5,459) indicated that Benevolent Sexism (BS) in women was associated with greater preferences for high-resource partners (r = 0.24), whereas Hostile Sexism (HS) in men was associated with stronger preferences for physically attractive partners (r = 0.20). Study 2 examined the ideological correlates of this gender… 

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