A Draft Sequence of the Neandertal Genome

@article{Green2010ADS,
  title={A Draft Sequence of the Neandertal Genome},
  author={Richard E. Green and Johannes Krause and Adrian W. Briggs and Tomislav Maricic and Udo Stenzel and Martin Kircher and Nick J. Patterson and Heng Li and Weiwei Zhai and Markus Hsi-Yang Fritz and Nancy F. Hansen and Eric Durand and Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas and Jeffrey D. Jensen and Tom{\`a}s Marqu{\`e}s-Bonet and Can Alkan and Kay Pr{\"u}fer and Matthias Meyer and Hern{\'a}n A. Burbano and Jeffrey Martin Good and R Schultz and Ayinuer Aximu-Petri and Anne Butthof and Barbara H{\"o}ber and Barbara H{\"o}ffner and M. Siegemund and Antje Weihmann and Chad Nusbaum and Eric S. Lander and C. Babcock Russ and Nathaniel Novod and Jason P. Affourtit and Michael Wayland Egholm and Christine Verna and Pavao Rudan and Dejana Brajkovi{\'c} and Željko Ku{\'c}an and Ivan Gu{\vs}i{\'c} and Vladimir Doronichev and Liubov V. Golovanova and Carles Lalueza-Fox and Marco de la Rasilla and Javier Fortea and Antonio Rosas and Ralf W. Schmitz and Philip L. F. Johnson and Evan E. Eichler and Daniel Falush and Ewan Birney and James C. Mullikin and Montgomery Slatkin and Rasmus Nielsen and Janet Kelso and Michael Lachmann and David Reich and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={328},
  pages={710 - 722}
}
Kissing Cousins Neandertals, our closest relatives, ranged across Europe and Southwest Asia before their extinction approximately 30,000 years ago. Green et al. (p. 710) report a draft sequence of the Neandertal genome, created from three individuals, and compare it with genomes of five modern humans. The results suggest that ancient genomes of human relatives can be recovered with acceptably low contamination from modern human DNA. Because ancient DNA can be contaminated with microbial DNA… 
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