A Dose-Response Curve Describing the Relationship Between Urban Tree Cover Density and Self-Reported Stress Recovery

@article{Jiang2016ADC,
  title={A Dose-Response Curve Describing the Relationship Between Urban Tree Cover Density and Self-Reported Stress Recovery},
  author={B Jiang and Dongying Li and Linda Larsen and William C. Sullivan},
  journal={Environment and Behavior},
  year={2016},
  volume={48},
  pages={607 - 629}
}
Although it is well established that viewing nature can help individuals recover from a stressful experience, the dose-response curve describing the relationship between tree cover density and stress recovery is totally unclear. A total of 160 participants engaged in a standard Trier Social Stress Test to induce stress. Participants were then randomly assigned to watch 1 of 10 three-dimensional videos of street scenes that varied in the density of tree cover (from 2% to 62%). Participants… 

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