A Delphi Study on Issues for Successful IT Transfer Process in the Arab World

Abstract

Adoption of enabling technology is one beneficial and significant way countries can improve their developmental progress and achieve higher living standards. Many complex issues are involved in the consideration of information technology transfer. Some of those issues are not completely defined and studied, or cannot be precisely measured. Thus, a Delphi study was conducted in this research to investigate, identify and prioritise major issues for successful information technology transfer in developing countries from the perceptions of stakeholder groups in the Arab World. Responses were elicited from information technology academics, information technology practitioners, government officials and information technology suppliers. Valid questionnaires were returned from 73 respondents in the first round survey, providing a net response rate of 61% and yielded 410 perceived issues. Through two rounds of the Delphi survey, these issues have been synthesised and categorised into 10 major issue categories with 71 sub-issues. This study aims to assist in understanding the major issues surrounding information technology transfer success in the Arab World and to better realise the benefits of information technology transfer. 1. Introduction The technology transfer concept has been one of the complicated issues for developing countries during the last four decades. Developing countries such as those in the Arab World are at quite heterogeneous stages of industrial development and tend to differ according to their situations and the dynamics of their strategic pathways of development. Technology is important as it supports and sustains socioeconomic growth, human needs and national development. More specifically, technology is believed to be one of the major forces promoting socioeconomic growth; therefore, an efficient technology transfer system is expected to lead to an optimum use of resources [13, 30]. Technology transfer has long been identified as a key issue within the development process. However, the history of technology transfer has not been one of unqualified success. Many failures have occurred for reasons that have not always been clear [3, 5]. Information Technology (IT) is becoming an increasingly significant component of projects undertaken by international development organisations [18]. It provides a means by which countries progress and succeed in international economic, political, social, cultural and educational domains. IT is beneficial in improving productivity, efficiency and administration and in maximising usage of limited resources. Therefore, IT transfer seeks to promote economic growth, competitiveness, equitable distribution of goods and services, access to global markets, and support business processes, as well as narrowing the gap between developed …

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