A Cyanobacterial Gene in Nonphotosynthetic Protists—An Early Chloroplast Acquisition in Eukaryotes?

@article{Andersson2002ACG,
  title={A Cyanobacterial Gene in Nonphotosynthetic Protists—An Early Chloroplast Acquisition in Eukaryotes?},
  author={Jan O. Andersson and Andrew J. Roger},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={12},
  pages={115-119}
}

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This chapter provides an overview of the origin and diversification of plastids across the eukaryotic tree of life, an area of basic research that has benefited tremendously from advances in genomics and molecular biology.

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This chapter provides an overview of the origin and diversification of plastids across the eukaryotic tree of life, an area of basic research that has benefited tremendously from advances in genomics and molecular biology.
...

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