A Culture of Genius: How an Organization’s Lay Theory Shapes People’s Cognition, Affect, and Behavior

@article{Murphy2010ACO,
  title={A Culture of Genius: How an Organization’s Lay Theory Shapes People’s Cognition, Affect, and Behavior},
  author={M. C. Murphy and C. Dweck},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2010},
  volume={36},
  pages={283 - 296}
}
Traditionally, researchers have conceptualized implicit theories as individual differences—lay theories that vary between people. This article, however, investigates the consequences of organization-level implicit theories of intelligence. In five studies, the authors examine how an organization’s fixed (entity) or malleable (incremental) theory of intelligence affects people’s inferences about what is valued, their self- and social judgments, and their behavioral decisions. In Studies 1 and 2… Expand

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