A Cross-Sectional Survey of Medical Cannabis Users: Patterns of Use and Perceived Efficacy

@article{Sexton2016ACS,
  title={A Cross-Sectional Survey of Medical Cannabis Users: Patterns of Use and Perceived Efficacy},
  author={M. Sexton and C. Cuttler and J. Finnell and Laurie K Mischley},
  journal={Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research},
  year={2016},
  volume={1},
  pages={131 - 138}
}
Abstract Background: The political climate around Cannabis as a medicine is rapidly changing. Legislators are adopting policies regarding appropriate medical applications, while the paucity of research may make policy decisions around conditions for which Cannabis is an effective medicine difficult. Methods: An anonymous online survey was developed to query medical Cannabis users about the conditions they use Cannabis to treat, their use patterns, perception of efficacy, and physical and mental… Expand
Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs – a cross-sectional study
TLDR
Patient-reported outcomes support prior research that individuals are using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs, particularly, narcotics/opioids, and independent of whether they identify themselves as medical or non-medical users. Expand
Indications and administration practices amongst medical cannabis healthcare providers: a cross-sectional survey
TLDR
Individuals who recommend the medical use of cannabis appear to be self-generating a community standard of practice in the absence of formal clinical guidelines on dosing, interactions and other characteristics. Expand
A Survey of Cannabis Acute Effects and Withdrawal Symptoms: Differential Responses Across User Types and Age
TLDR
Older people and medical users appear to experience acute and withdrawal effects of cannabis differently than recreational and younger users, perhaps because these groups benefit more from the medicinal properties of cannabis. Expand
An Exploration of Self-Reported Medicinal Cannabis Use Among a Sample of Eastern Canadian Postsecondary Students
TLDR
Medical cannabis use among postsecondary students appears to be largely motivated for mental health related conditions and is grounded in personal experience versus evidence-based guidelines, and there is a need for increased communication between HCPs and patients to promote lower-risk use among medicinal cannabis users. Expand
Beyond the high: Mapping patterns of use and motives for use of cannabis as medicine
TLDR
A new user group has emerged in Denmark that, for the most part, use illegally sourced CaM to treat a broad range of somatic and mental health conditions, often with experienced effect and relatively low level of side-effects. Expand
Medical cannabis use in the Australian community following introduction of legal access: the 2018–2019 Online Cross-Sectional Cannabis as Medicine Survey (CAMS-18)
TLDR
Chronic pain, mental health and sleep remain the main clinical conditions for which consumers report using medical cannabis, despite 2 years of legal availability, most consumers in Australia reported accessing illicit cannabis products, with uncertainty regarding the quality or composition of cannabis products. Expand
Evaluation of Patient Reported Safety and Efficacy of Cannabis From a Survey of Medical Cannabis Patients in Canada
TLDR
Results show that patients find cannabis treatment effective for a broad range of medical conditions, but cannabis was not a remedy for all the conditions investigated, and there is a need for future clinical research to support the findings. Expand
Medical Reasons for Marijuana Use, Forms of Use, and Patient Perception of Physician Attitudes Among the US Population
TLDR
Americans are using marijuana to treat medical conditions despite lack of evidence of efficacy, and women were more likely to use marijuana for posttraumatic stress disorder, sleep, anxiety, and migraines. Expand
Overbaked: assessing and predicting acute adverse reactions to Cannabis
TLDR
A more comprehensive account of possible adverse reactions to cannabis, and individual difference variables that predict these reactions are provided, has implications for inexperienced cannabis users, as well as medical professionals and budtenders who provide information about cannabis use. Expand
Willingness to Participate in Longitudinal Research Among People with Chronic Pain Who Take Medical Cannabis: A Cross-Sectional Survey
TLDR
Recruitment for longitudinal cohort studies with frequent data collection appears feasible in this patient population of patients with chronic pain and Enhanced engagement with older individuals may be needed to promote equal enrollment. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 55 REFERENCES
The medicinal use of cannabis in the UK: results of a nationwide survey
TLDR
The results of a self‐administered questionnaire study conducted in the United Kingdom between 1998 and 2002 point to the need for clinical studies of cannabis and cannabinoids with standardised and quality‐controlled products. Expand
Therapeutic benefits of cannabis: a patient survey.
  • C. W. Webb, S. M. Webb
  • Medicine
  • Hawai'i journal of medicine & public health : a journal of Asia Pacific Medicine & Public Health
  • 2014
TLDR
Cannabis appears to alleviate pain, insomnia, and may be helpful in relieving anxiety, and deserves to be released from the current Schedule I federal prohibition against research and prescription. Expand
Cannabis as a substitute for alcohol and other drugs
TLDR
The substitution of one psychoactive substance for another with the goal of reducing negative outcomes can be included within the framework of harm reduction. Expand
Cannabis for therapeutic purposes: patient characteristics, access, and reasons for use.
TLDR
Results indicate a substantial disconnect between the therapeutic use of cannabis and research on the risks and benefits of such use; particularly with regard to the anxiolytic and sedative use of marijuana. Expand
Medical Cannabis Patients: Patient Profiles and Health Care Utilization Patterns
TLDR
Results show that patients tend to be males older than 35, identify with multiple ethnicities, and report variable symptom duration and current health status, and satisfaction with medical cannabis facilities is significantly higher than nationally reported satisfaction with health care. Expand
Cannabis, motivation, and life satisfaction in an internet sample
TLDR
Daily use of cannabis does not impair motivation, and its impact on subjective wellbeing is small, which may actually reflect lower wellbeing due to medical symptoms rather than actual consumption of the plant. Expand
Prevalence of medical marijuana use in California, 2012.
TLDR
The study's results lend support to the idea that medical marijuana is used equally by many groups of people and is not exclusively used by any one specific group. Expand
Who Are Medical Marijuana Patients? Population Characteristics from Nine California Assessment Clinics
TLDR
Pain, insomnia, and anxiety were the most common conditions for which evaluating physicians recommended medical marijuana, and shifts in the medical marijuana patient population over time, the need for further research, and the issue of diversion are discussed. Expand
Are medical marijuana users different from recreational users? The view from primary care.
TLDR
The results suggest that there are few distinct differences between medical and recreational users of marijuana, and the differences observed, while mostly very small in effect size, are consistent with at least some medical users employing marijuana to relieve symptoms and distress associated with medical illness. Expand
Self-Medication of Somatic and Psychiatric Conditions Using Botanical Marijuana
TLDR
These findings may be of interest to clinicians as they treat patients, to lawmakers and policymakers as they consider legislation allowing physicians to recommend botanical marijuana for somatic and psychiatric conditions, and to researchers evaluating conditions that individuals elect to self-medicate using botanicalarijuana. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...