A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Autobiographical Memory

@article{Conway2005ACI,
  title={A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Autobiographical Memory},
  author={Martin A. Conway and Qi Wang and Kazunori Hanyu and Shamsul Haque},
  journal={Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={36},
  pages={739 - 749}
}
Groups from Japan, China, Bangladesh, England, and the United States recalled, described, and dated specific autobiographical memories. When memories were plotted in terms of age-at-encoding highly similar life-span memory retrieval curves were observed: the periods of childhood amnesia and the reminiscence bump were the same across cultures. However, content analysis of memory descriptions of the U.S. and Chinese groups found that memories from the Chinese group had interdependent self-focus… 

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