A Critique of Elie Halévy

@article{Vergara1998ACO,
  title={A Critique of Elie Hal{\'e}vy},
  author={Francisco Vergara},
  journal={Philosophy},
  year={1998},
  volume={73},
  pages={97 - 111}
}
The prestigious French publisher Presses Universitaires de France has recently brought out (November 1995) a new French edition of Elie Halévy's well known book The Growth of Philosophical Radicalism, first published in France in three volumes as La formation du radicalisme philosophique (1901–1904) and translated into English in 1926. The prevailing opinion on this book is that it gives an excellent account of English utilitarianism. Thus, in the International Encyclopedia of Social Sciences… 

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