A Conceptual Model for Persuasive In-Vehicle Technology to Influence Tactical Level Driver Behaviour

@inproceedings{Gent2019ACM,
  title={A Conceptual Model for Persuasive In-Vehicle Technology to Influence Tactical Level Driver Behaviour},
  author={P. L. van Gent and Haneen Farah and Nicole van Nes and Bart van Arem},
  year={2019}
}
  • P. L. van Gent, Haneen Farah, +1 author Bart van Arem
  • Published 2019
  • Psychology
  • Persuasive in-vehicle systems aim to intuitively influence the attitudes and/or behaviour of a driver (i.e. without forcing them). However, the challenge in using these systems in a driving setting, is to maximise the persuasive effect without infringing upon the driver's safety. This paper proposes a conceptual model for driver persuasion at the tactical level (i.e., driver manoeuvring level, such as lane-changing and car-following). The main focus of the conceptual model is to describe how to… CONTINUE READING

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