A Complete mtDNA Genome of an Early Modern Human from Kostenki, Russia

@article{Krause2010ACM,
  title={A Complete mtDNA Genome of an Early Modern Human from Kostenki, Russia},
  author={Johannes Krause and Adrian W. Briggs and Martin Kircher and Tomislav Maricic and Nicolas Zwyns and Anatoli P. Derevianko and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={20},
  pages={231-236}
}

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