A Comparison of the Cell Phone Driver and the Drunk Driver

@article{Strayer2006ACO,
  title={A Comparison of the Cell Phone Driver and the Drunk Driver},
  author={D. Strayer and F. Drews and D. Crouch},
  journal={Human Factors: The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society},
  year={2006},
  volume={48},
  pages={381 - 391}
}
  • D. Strayer, F. Drews, D. Crouch
  • Published 2006
  • Engineering, Medicine, Computer Science
  • Human Factors: The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Objective: The objective of this research was to determine the relative impairment associated with conversing on a cellular telephone while driving. Background: Epidemiological evidence suggests that the relative risk of being in a traffic accident while using a cell phone is similar to the hazard associated with driving with a blood alcohol level at the legal limit. The purpose of this research was to provide a direct comparison of the driving performance of a cell phone driver and a drunk… Expand
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Cellular phone subscribership in the United States has grown dramatically in recent years, from 92,000 people in 1985 to more than 77,000,000 in 1999. Cellular phones in cars provide importantExpand
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The number of wireless phone subscribers in the U.S. is constantly growing. Studies have shown that use of wireless phones while driving contributes to crashes. Efforts to pass legislation allowingExpand
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