A Comparison of Social Organization in Asian Elephants and African Savannah Elephants

@article{deSilva2011ACO,
  title={A Comparison of Social Organization in Asian Elephants and African Savannah Elephants},
  author={Shermin de Silva and George Wittemyer},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2011},
  volume={33},
  pages={1125-1141}
}
Asian and African elephant species have diverged by ca. 6 million years, but as large, generalist herbivores they occupy similar niches in their respective environments. Although the multilevel, hierarchical nature of African savannah elephant societies is well established, it has been unclear whether Asian elephants behave similarly. Here we quantitatively compare the structure of both species’ societies using association data collected using the same protocol over similar time periods… 

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