A Comparison of Modern and Preindustrial Levels of Mercury in the Teeth of Beluga in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, and Walrus at Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada

@article{Outridge2002ACO,
  title={A Comparison of Modern and Preindustrial Levels of Mercury in the Teeth of Beluga in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, and Walrus at Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada},
  author={P. Outridge and K. Hobson and R. McNeely and A. Dyke},
  journal={Arctic},
  year={2002},
  volume={55},
  pages={123-132}
}
Mercury (Hg) concentrations were compared in modern and preindustrial teeth of belugas ( Delphinapterus leucas ) and walrus ( Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus ) at sites in the Canadian Arctic so that the relative amounts of natural and anthropogenic Hg in modern animals could be estimated. Mercury levels in the teeth of Beaufort Sea belugas captured in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, in 1993 were significantly (p = 0.0001) higher than those in archeological samples dated A.D. 1450-1650… Expand

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