A Comment on an Alleged Association between Hypnosis and Death: Two Remarkable Cases

@article{Frischholz2009ACO,
  title={A Comment on an Alleged Association between Hypnosis and Death: Two Remarkable Cases},
  author={Edward J. Frischholz and Alan W. Scheflin},
  journal={American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis},
  year={2009},
  volume={52},
  pages={45 - 67}
}
Abstract Dr. Ewin recently reported his research on two “remarkable” cases where hypnosis performed by a lay hypnotist was allegedly associated with the death of the subject. Commentary is provided about both cases. In the first case, it seems clear that the death was co-incident to the hypnosis. In the second case, Dr. Ewin speculates that hypnosis may have been related to the subject's death following her experience in a stage hypnosis show. Instead, we propose that the alerting suggestion… 
Inadvertent Adverse Consequences of Clinical and Forensic Hypnosis: Minimizing the Risks
  • B. N. Eimer
  • Psychology
    The American journal of clinical hypnosis
  • 2012
TLDR
Fundamentals of hypnosis risk management are covered as a foundation for beginners and as a review for experienced practitioners, and various straightforward safeguards that should be heeded by all practitioners are discussed.
Developing clinical hypnotherapy educational guidelines through consensus

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 104 REFERENCES
Death and Hypnosis: Two Remarkable Cases
  • D. M. Ewin
  • Psychology
    The American journal of clinical hypnosis
  • 2008
TLDR
It is found that on September 23, 1993 a healthy 24-year old mother of two was found dead at home, fully clothed and draped across the foot of one of her children's bed, 5 hours after volunteering as a subject for a stage hypnosis show.
The alleged dangers of stage hypnosis
From time to time, the safety of hypnosis and its possible misuse are subjected to attention in the learned literature and the mass media. In the UK in the 1990s, there was a surge of interest in
The Future of Professional Hypnosis: Comment on Kirsch, Mazzoni, and Montgomery
  • E. Frischholz
  • Psychology
    The American journal of clinical hypnosis
  • 2007
TLDR
The ramifications of the facts espoused in Kirsch, Mazzoni and Montgomery's paper and their interrelationships for the future of professional hypnosis (experimental, clinical and forensic) are identified and discussed.
Hypnosis, the Hidden Observer, and Not-So-Hidden Consent
  • S. Lynn
  • Psychology
    The American journal of clinical hypnosis
  • 2001
TLDR
It is my belief that prudent clinical practice dictates clearly stating in an informed consent document that hidden observers, and for that matter, “inner advisors,’ “ego states,” and related metaphors, are in no way true personality fragments or independent entities with distinct past histories.
Opinion: Informed consent: Right or rite?
TLDR
The Court of Appeals reversed a judgment for the plaintiff, but it recog nized for the first time that a physician might be held liable for failure to provide informed consent.
Informed Consent and Uninformed Clinical Practice: Dissociation, Hypnosis and False Memories
  • S. Lynn
  • Psychology
    The American journal of clinical hypnosis
  • 2001
TLDR
My suggestion to provide patients with informed consent regarding the metaphorical nature of hidden observers, inner advisors, ego states and the like, was rejected by the commentators.
Some after-effects of stage hypnosis: a case study of psychopathological manifestations.
TLDR
A middle-aged respected member of a kibbutz who became the subject of an evening's entertainment by a stage hypnotist suffered a posttraumatic neurosis and was self-referred for adequate psychiatric treatment, which restored her to an adequate level of functioning.
Preferences for Descriptors of Hypnosis: A Brief Communication
  • Ciara Christensen
  • Psychology
    The International journal of clinical and experimental hypnosis
  • 2005
TLDR
Alternative descriptors of the capacity to experience hypnosis, intended to describe the same phenomenon, appear in the current literature and Hypnotizability was chosen nearly 4 times more frequently than the next most favored choice (susceptibility) as a descriptor of hypnotic talent.
Hypnosis, Hynotizability, and Placebo
  • E. Frischholz
  • Psychology
    The American journal of clinical hypnosis
  • 2007
TLDR
The possibility that there may be such thing as a “good placebo responder (GPR)” is questioned, while the known clinical value of hypnotizability assessment is reaffirmed.
Hypnosis and pseudomemories: the effects of prehypnotic expectancies.
TLDR
Subjects led to believe that hypnosis is an altered state of consciousness were less aware of external events, and had the lowest rate of recall of target suggestions compared with subjects in the comparison groups.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...