A Colorful Albino: The First Documented Case of Synaesthesia, by Georg Tobias Ludwig Sachs in 1812

@article{Jewanski2009ACA,
  title={A Colorful Albino: The First Documented Case of Synaesthesia, by Georg Tobias Ludwig Sachs in 1812},
  author={J{\"o}rg Jewanski and Sean A. Day and Jamie Ward},
  journal={Journal of the History of the Neurosciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={18},
  pages={293 - 303}
}
In 1812, Georg Sachs published a medical dissertation concerning his own albinism and that of his sister. However, he also goes on to describe another phenomenon — namely synaesthesia involving colors for music and simple sequences (including numbers, days, and letters). Most contemporary researchers of synaesthesia fail to cite the case when offering a history of the subject and fewer still will have read it (the original was published in Latin). In this article, we argue that Sachs's case is… Expand
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