A Cohort Study of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Impacts on Birth Outcomes

@article{Brauer2008ACS,
  title={A Cohort Study of Traffic-Related Air Pollution Impacts on Birth Outcomes},
  author={Michael Brauer and Cornel Lencar and Lillian Tamburic and Mieke Koehoorn and Paul A Demers and Catherine J. Karr},
  journal={Environmental Health Perspectives},
  year={2008},
  volume={116},
  pages={680 - 686}
}
Background Evidence suggests that air pollution exposure adversely affects pregnancy outcomes. Few studies have examined individual-level intraurban exposure contrasts. Objectives We evaluated the impacts of air pollution on small for gestational age (SGA) birth weight, low full-term birth weight (LBW), and preterm birth using spatiotemporal exposure metrics. Methods With linked administrative data, we identified 70,249 singleton births (1999–2002) with complete covariate data (sex, ethnicity… 
Impact of Noise and Air Pollution on Pregnancy Outcomes
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Noise exposure was negatively associated with term birth weight and in joint air pollution-noise models, associations between noise andterm birth weight remained largely unchanged, whereas associations decreased for all air pollutants.
A national study of the association between traffic-related air pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes in Canada, 1999-2008.
TLDR
Significant associations of NO2 with SGA and term birth weight which remained significant after adjustment for PM2.5 are found, suggesting that traffic may be a particularly important source with respect to the role of air pollution as a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes.
Traffic-related air pollution, preterm birth and term birth weight in the PIAMA birth cohort study.
TLDR
Maternal exposure to traffic-related air pollution during pregnancy was not associated with term birth weight and there was a tendency towards an increased risk of preterm birth with increasing air pollution exposure, but statistical power was low.
Comparing exposure assessment methods for traffic-related air pollution in an adverse pregnancy outcome study.
TLDR
It was generally confirmed that traffic-related air pollution was associated with adverse reproductive outcomes regardless of the exposure assessment method employed, yet the size of the estimated effect depended on how both temporal and spatial variations were incorporated into exposure assessment.
Ambient air pollution and term birth weight in Texas from 1998 to 2004
TLDR
The findings confirm results found previously for adverse effects of the air pollutant SO2 on lower birth weight and suggest that adverse pregnancy outcomes can occur even while maintaining air pollution levels below regulatory standards.
Ambient air pollution and low birthweight: a European cohort study (ESCAPE).
TLDR
Exposure to ambient air pollutants and traffic during pregnancy is associated with restricted fetal growth and a substantial proportion of cases of low birthweight at term could be prevented in Europe if urban air pollution was reduced.
Investigating the association between birth weight and complementary air pollution metrics: a cohort study
TLDR
Exposure to air pollution is frequently associated with reductions in birth weight but results of available studies vary widely, possibly in part because of differences in air pollution metrics, so it is necessary to assess the consistency of such patterns across populations.
Air pollution exposure during pregnancy and reduced birth size: a prospective birth cohort study in Valencia, Spain
TLDR
Prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution may reduce fetal growth and provide further evidence of the need for developing strategies to reduce air pollution in order to prevent risks to fetal health and development.
Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Birthweight: Differences in Associations Along the Birthweight Distribution.
TLDR
In full-term live births, PM2.5 and birthweight were negatively associated with more severe associations at lower quantiles of birthweight, and the magnitudes of negative associations were larger at lower deciles.
Ambient air pollution and markers of fetal growth: A retrospective population-based cohort study of 2.57 million term singleton births in China.
TLDR
The findings suggest that maternal exposure to air pollution during pregnancy is adversely affecting fetal growth and effect estimates of heterogeneity suggested that maternal age and infant sex modified the impact of air pollution on birth weight.
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