A Cognitive Framework for Mate Choice and Species Recognition

@article{Phelps2005ACF,
  title={A Cognitive Framework for Mate Choice and Species Recognition},
  author={Steven M. Phelps and Austin Stanley Rand and Michael J. Ryan},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2005},
  volume={167},
  pages={28 - 42}
}
Mating decisions contribute to both the fitness of individuals and the emergence of evolutionary diversity, yet little is known about their cognitive architecture. We propose a simple model that describes how preferences are translated into decisions and how seemingly disparate patterns of preference can emerge from a single perceptual process. The model proposes that females use error‐prone estimates of attractiveness to select mates based on a simple decision rule: choose the most attractive… 
Mate Choice, Sex Roles and Sexual Cognition: Neuronal Prerequisites Supporting Cognitive Mate Choice
  • T. Fuss
  • Psychology, Biology
    Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
  • 2021
TLDR
This review aims to summarize evidence for cognitive abilities influencing mate choice and vice versa and to throw a spotlight on neuronal prerequisites, networks and processes supporting the interaction between mate choice, sex roles and sexual cognition, hence, supporting cognitive mate choice.
Neural and molecular mechanisms underlying female mate choice decisions in vertebrates
TLDR
How social and/or ecological influences mediate female choice and how this occurs within the brain is discussed along with future avenues of research that will broaden the current knowledge of this process.
The Computational Mechanisms of Mate Choice
TLDR
A sequential analysis model of decision making based on a two-component signal, in which the first component encodes information important for mate quality assessment and the second component for species recognition is presented.
Mate choice rules in animals
omputational mate choice : Theory and empirical evidence
The present review is based on the thesis that mate choice results from information-processing mechanisms governed by computational rules and that, to understand how females choose their mates, we
A THEORETICAL APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING MATE SEARCHING BEHAVIOR IN FEMALES
TLDR
It was found that old (i.e. experienced) females had higher fitness than young ones, and that increases in female exigency leads to decreases in female fitness and increases in male fitness, suggesting that variation in female behavior may result in sexual conflict.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 50 REFERENCES
The evolution of mate choice and the potential for conflict between species and mate–quality recognition
  • K. Pfennig
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1998
TLDR
When a conflict may occur between species and mate–quality recognition is suggested, the evolutionary consequences stemming from this conflict are discussed, and a model of mate–preference evolution in response to heterospecifics is presented.
A Comparative Bayes tactic for mate assessment and choice
TLDR
An alternative model of information gathering and mate choice, which relaxes the assumptions of random encounters and perfect information, is presented, and this Comparative Bayes model, the decision of when and from whom to collect information is made using Bayesian estimates of each male's quality.
Measuring female mating preferences
TLDR
Experimental designs commonly used for testing female preferences make it difficult to quantify the preferences of individual females, so repeated measures of individual preference functions allow measurement of within- and between-female variation in preferences.
Sexual selection and signal evolution : the ghost of biases past
TLDR
It is suggested that some of the difficulty in understanding preference evolution might derive from defining a preference only by those extant stimuli that elicit the preference, and that signal diversity might arise from alternative means for eliciting the same preference.
The shape of female mating preferences.
  • M. Ritchie
  • Biology, Psychology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1996
TLDR
Preference shapes are shown to be genetic in origin, compatible with a coevolutionary model of signal-preference evolution, although it does not rule out an alternative model, sensory exploitation.
Generalization in Response to Mate Recognition Signals
TLDR
It is shown that females perceive variation in allopatric mating signals in a continuous manner with no evidence of perceptual category formation, and the strength of recognition is predicted by how different the target stimulus is from the conspecific call within a series of calls.
Pattern recognition and call preferences in treefrogs (Anura: Hylidae): a quantitative analysis using a no-choice paradigm
TLDR
A single-stimulus design is used to examine mate attraction in two sibling species of treefrogs and quantified female responses based upon the relative time required to approach signals varying in pulse rate, pulse rise time and pulse number reveal broad similarities with data from choice experiments.
Speciation by Natural and Sexual Selection: Models and Experiments
TLDR
It is shown that the geographical context of speciation can be viewed as a form of assortative mating and this provides a framework for interpreting results from laboratory experiments, which are found to agree generally with theoretical predictions about conditions that are favorable to the evolution of prezygotic isolation.
Neural networks predict response biases of female túngara frogs
  • S. Phelps, M. Ryan
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1998
TLDR
It is found that not only were networks capable of recognizing the call of the túngara frog, but that they made remarkably accurate quantitative predictions about how well females generalized to many novel calls, and that these predictions were stable over several architectures.
Vestigial preference functions in neural networks and túngara frogs.
  • S. Phelps, M. Ryan, A. S. Rand
  • Biology, Psychology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2001
TLDR
The data strongly suggest that female túngara frogs exhibitigial preferences for ancestral calls, and provide a general strategy for exploring the role of historical contingency in perceptual biases.
...
...