A Clinical and Pharmacologic Review of Skeletal Muscle Relaxants for Musculoskeletal Conditions

@article{Beebe2005ACA,
  title={A Clinical and Pharmacologic Review of Skeletal Muscle Relaxants for Musculoskeletal Conditions},
  author={Frank A. Beebe and Robert L. Barkin and Stacie Barkin},
  journal={American Journal of Therapeutics},
  year={2005},
  volume={12},
  pages={151-171}
}
Muscle strains and other musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a leading cause of work absenteeism. Muscle pain, spasm, swelling, and inflammation are symptomatic of strains. The precise relationship between musculoskeletal pain and spasm is not well understood. The dictum that pain induces spasm, which causes more pain, is not substantiated by critical analysis. The painful muscle may not show EMG activity, and when there is, the timing and intensity often do not correlate with the pain… 
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TLDR
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