A Climate Model of the Red Imported Fire Ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): Implications for Invasion of New Regions, Particularly Oceania

@inproceedings{Sutherst2005ACM,
  title={A Climate Model of the Red Imported Fire Ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): Implications for Invasion of New Regions, Particularly Oceania},
  author={Robert W. Sutherst and G. F. Maywald},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract The paucity of empirical data on processes in species life cycles demands tools to extract insight from field observations. Such insights help inform policy on invasive species and on impacts of climate change at regional and local scales. We used the CLIMEX model to infer the response of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), to temperature and moisture from its range in the United States. We tested hypotheses on the mechanisms that limit the… Expand
Predicting the Potential Distribution of an Invasive Species, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), under Climate Change using Species Distribution Models
TLDR
A potential distribution of red imported fire ant is provided that is necessary to establish a proper quarantine plan for their management to minimize adverse impacts of climate change. Expand
Modelling the potential spread of Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) (red imported fire ant) in Australia
TLDR
Two linked models that estimate the spread of Solenopsis invicta Buren (red imported fire ant) in Australia based on limited data gathered after its discovery in Brisbane in 2001 suggest rates of expansion are higher than those experienced in the USA in the 1940s during the early invasion phases in that country. Expand
The potential distribution of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), in New Zealand
TLDR
Red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta Buren, are not established in New Zealand but are considered to have a very high likelihood of introduction and establishment and may have a relatively restricted distribution. Expand
Prediction of Spatiotemporal Invasive Risk by the Red Imported Fire Ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in South Korea
In this study, we analyzed the potential distribution of red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), in response to climate change in South Korea using CLIMEX, aExpand
Climate Change Impacts on the Potential Distribution and Abundance of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) With Special Reference to North America and Europe
  • E. Kistner
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Environmental Entomology
  • 2017
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Prime horticultural production areas in Europe, the northeastern United States, and southeastern Canada are at greatest risk from H. halys under both current and possible future climates. Expand
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Climate change and biological invasions are among the greatest threats to biodiversity, and their impacts might increase by the end of this century. Among invasive species, ants are a prominent groupExpand
Comparative Population Genetics of Red Imported Fire Ants (Solenopsis invicta) at the University of Central Oklahoma and Lake Arcadia, Edmond, Oklahoma
Abstract The red imported fire ant is a well-studied pest in the southern United States, but investigations of invasions in the central region are relatively rare. We compared two central OklahomaExpand
Influence of Low Humidity, Pseudacteon Flies (Diptera: Phoridae), and Competition by Solenopsis xyloni on Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
TLDR
This research studied the influence of the fire ant parasitoid Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier (Phoridae), low humidity, and competition with S. xyloni on the survival and fitness of S. invicta in the southwestern United States. Expand
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A dynamic, ecophysiological model of colony growth is used to predict the potential global range expansion of this invasive species, S. invicta, which has diverse detrimental impacts on recipient communities and has the potential to colonize numerous other regions. Expand
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Seasonal studies on a 1,200-ha isolated infestation of Solenopsis invicta Buren located in McMinn County, TN, were initiated in 1993 and continued through 1997 and data collected over four winters indicate that consecutive days at a low ambient air maximum temperature is more indicative of S. Invicta winter survivability than minimum temperature. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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