A Classification Scheme for Paradoxical Vocal Cord Motion

@article{Maschka1997ACS,
  title={A Classification Scheme for Paradoxical Vocal Cord Motion},
  author={Donald A. Maschka and Nancy M. Bauman and Paul B. McCray and Henry T. Hoffman and Michael P. Karnell and Richard J. H. Smith},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={1997},
  volume={107}
}
Paradoxical vocal cord motion (PVCM) is characterized by the inappropriate adduction of the true vocal cords during inspiration. Multiple causes have been proposed for this group of disorders, which share the common finding of mobile vocal cords that adduct inappropriately during inspiration and cause stridor by approximation. Management of this group of disorders has been complicated by the lack of a classification scheme to include all types of PVCM. We propose that PVCM be classified… 
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