A Case of Failed Counter-Insurgency: Anti-Partisan Operations in Yugoslavia 1943

@article{Trifkovi2011ACO,
  title={A Case of Failed Counter-Insurgency: Anti-Partisan Operations in Yugoslavia 1943},
  author={Gaj Trifkovi{\'c}},
  journal={The Journal of Slavic Military Studies},
  year={2011},
  volume={24},
  pages={314 - 336}
}
  • Gaj Trifković
  • Published 1 April 2011
  • Sociology
  • The Journal of Slavic Military Studies
This article examines operations “Weiss” and “Schwarz,” two of the largest anti-guerrilla sweeps conducted by the German Wehrmacht during the entire Second World War. Four reinforced divisions with ca. 65,000 German soldiers and up to 100 aircraft took part in what is regarded as the most ferocious fighting of the whole war in Yugoslavia. Although conducted with maximum effort in material terms, they were doomed to failure because of the Third Reich's neglect of guerrilla warfare and the… 
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References

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Apart from sixty Croatian, it also had some forty German airplanes (NAW, T78, Roll 332, 6289919, Situation estimate for
Legionary Divisions like the 369 th had two instead of the usual three regiments
One report of KG 'Annacker' provided excuses for some tasks not being carried out. Kübler added with pencil 'It was nonetheless possible for the Partisans
Roll 2154,000502, Combat-and ration strength of the 369 th infantry Division
The name was changed in March 1943 to 'Air Force Commander Croatia' ('Fliegerführer Kroatien')
When the terrain allowed, division's motorized equipment could perform well, as shown by the swift capture of Glamoc at the beginning of March: NAW, T315, Roll 2154,000349, Note to war diary for 2