A Case-Control Study of the Protective Effect of Alcohol, Coffee, and Cigarette Consumption on Parkinson Disease Risk: Time-Since-Cessation Modifies the Effect of Tobacco Smoking

@article{vanderMark2014ACS,
  title={A Case-Control Study of the Protective Effect of Alcohol, Coffee, and Cigarette Consumption on Parkinson Disease Risk: Time-Since-Cessation Modifies the Effect of Tobacco Smoking},
  author={Marianne van der Mark and Peter C. G. Nijssen and Jelle J Vlaanderen and Anke Huss and Wim M. Mulleners and Antonetta M. G. Sas and Teus van Laar and Hans Kromhout and Roel C.H. Vermeulen},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2014},
  volume={9}
}
The aim of this study was to investigate the possible reduced risk of Parkinson Disease (PD) due to coffee, alcohol, and/or cigarette consumption. In addition, we explored the potential effect modification by intensity, duration and time-since-cessation of smoking on the association between cumulative pack-years of cigarette smoking (total smoking) and PD risk. Data of a hospital based case-control study was used including 444 PD patients, diagnosed between 2006 and 2011, and 876 matched… 

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