A COMPARISON OF THE CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING CHARACTERISTICS OF ANCIENT ROMAN HYDRAULIC CONCRETE WITH A MODERN REPRODUCTION OF VITRUVIAN HYDRAULIC CONCRETE

@article{Gotti2008ACO,
  title={A COMPARISON OF THE CHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING CHARACTERISTICS OF ANCIENT ROMAN HYDRAULIC CONCRETE WITH A MODERN REPRODUCTION OF VITRUVIAN HYDRAULIC CONCRETE},
  author={Emanuele Gotti and John Peter Oleson and L. Bottalico and Christopher Brandon and R. Cucitore and Robert L. Hohlfelder},
  journal={Archaeometry},
  year={2008},
  volume={50},
  pages={576-590}
}
The authors have completed structural and compositional analysis of Roman hydraulic concrete using large cores taken from a variety of maritime structures. In 2005 an 8 m 3 block of hydraulic, pozzolanic concrete was built in the sea at Brindisi (Italy), applying the materials and procedures specified by the Roman architect Vitruvius. Cores were taken at 6 months and 12 months after construction and subjected to the same analyses as the first-century BC cores from pilae associated with the… Expand
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Roman Concrete for Durable, Eco-Friendly Construction – Applications for Tidal Power Generation, and Protection against Sea Level Rise
  • C. Rhodes
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  • Science progress
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TLDR
The Ancient Romans were well aware of the robustness of their concrete, which they named opus caementicium, and some of their marine structures, including seawalls and harbour piers, still remain standing, and in good condition after 2,000 years. Expand
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