A COMPARISON OF DROSOPHILA HABITATS ACCORDING TO THE PHYSIOLOGICAL ATTRIBUTES OF THE ASSOCIATED YEAST COMMUNITIES

@article{Starmer1981ACO,
  title={A COMPARISON OF DROSOPHILA HABITATS ACCORDING TO THE PHYSIOLOGICAL ATTRIBUTES OF THE ASSOCIATED YEAST COMMUNITIES},
  author={William T. Starmer},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1981},
  volume={35}
}
  • W. T. Starmer
  • Published 1 January 1981
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Evolution
The diversity of Drosophila habitats attests to the evolutionary success of species in the genus. Drosophilae have been bred from a variety of substrates which include decaying plant tissue (fruits, stems, bark, wood, leaves and flowers), slime fluxes and exudates of trees and mushrooms (Carson, 197 1). Most of these habitats share the common characteristic of an abundant yeast microflora. The yeasts are saprophytic and serve to process the raw materials of the habitat into important dietary… 
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The Yeast Community of Cacti
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TLDR
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