A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SEX CHANGE IN LABRIDAE SUPPORTS THE SIZE ADVANTAGE HYPOTHESIS

@article{Kazancolu2010ACA,
  title={A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SEX CHANGE IN LABRIDAE SUPPORTS THE SIZE ADVANTAGE HYPOTHESIS},
  author={Erem Kazancıoğlu and Suzanne H. Alonzo},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2010},
  volume={64}
}
The size advantage hypothesis (SAH) predicts that the rate of increase in male and female fitness with size (the size advantage) drives the evolution of sequential hermaphroditism or sex change. Despite qualitative agreement between empirical patterns and SAH, only one comparative study tested SAH quantitatively. Here, we perform the first comparative analysis of sex change in Labridae, a group of hermaphroditic and dioecious (non–sex changer) fish with several model sex‐changing species. We… Expand

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